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THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR

The Thomas Crown Affair, two movies, really.

The first one dates back to 1968 and starred Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway. The story is actually rather simple: Thomas Crown is extremely rich and equally bored, which is why he organizes a hold-up in a bank (I know, not exactly what I do when I’m bored either but oh well…).

Vicki Anderson, the detective working for the bank’s insurance company, suspects the bored millionaire quite quickly. A long game of cat and mouse, punctuated with anthological scenes of seduction, like the chess game scene or the kiss, ensues.

The music is by Michel Legrand and the movie features the first ever “split screen” (which might make you slightly sick). Steve McQueen is definitely the King of Cool and Faye Dunaway is dressed divinely.

Yet, once the romantic conquest is over, the game of cat and mouse becomes painful and nothing particularly joyful or exciting happens.

A newer version came out in 1999, starring Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo.

Thomas Crown is incredibly rich and equally bored, so he orchestrates the robbery of a Monet from the New York Met (nope, I don’t do that when I’m bored either).

Catherine Banning is a detective who works for the insurance company covering the said Monet, and she suspects the bored millionaire quite quickly. A long game of cat and mouse ensues, punctuated with interesting seduction scenes, like the dancing scene, in which Rene Russo is the epitome of class wearing nothing but a sheer gown.

The movie only really kicks off once they’ve made love. She’s in love but wants to remain professional and find the missing work of art. He’s in love as well and desperately tries to secretly return the painting. They trust only themselves, and the key question is whether they will be able to confront their respective fears and insecurities.

I definitely preferred the 1999 version, which I thought to be full of joy, wit, subtlety and interesting innuendos concerning opposite-sex relationships. Catherine Banning, played by Rene Russo, is magnificent in the strength of her personality, charisma, intelligence, chic and sensuality.

I’m not sure why, but I think she would’ve approved of the outfit you see photographed here: neat, pure, feminine and masculine.

 

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Marquis Paris - Fashion Paris 2017

Max Mara coat – Apostrophe belt – Weill trousers – Dior heels – Fendi purse embellished with a Petitjean Paris scarf – Chanel sunglasses – O’Fée earrings

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